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Showing posts with the label Khammam

Jamalapuram Temple

Jamalapuram is a small village situated close to Yerrupalem town of Khammam district, Telangana, India.  Located about 85 km from Khammam town and 6 km from Yerrupalem railway station in serene atmosphere near the Pedda Cheruvu tank, the historical shrine attracts devotees from various parts of  Telangana and Andhra Pradesh. The village has an ancient temple dedicated to Lord Venkateswara. Here Lord Venkateswara is manifested in the form of swayambhu. The temple also boasts of Padmavathi Ammavari Temple, Sivalayam, Ganesh Temple, Anjaneya Swamy temple, Sri Alivelu Amma vari Temple and Ayyappa Swamy Temple.  The temple’s location amidst pleasant weather surrounded by lush green hills is an added attraction. The shrine in Khammam district, said to be over 800 years old, attracts devotees in droves. The ancient Swayambhu Sri Venkateswara Swamy temple at Jamalapuram is believed to be more than 850 years old, says Uppala Srinivasa Sarma, main priest of the shrine. The historical

Sthambadri Temple

The temple of Sri Narashima Swamy is located in the heart of the Town, which is popularly known to local people as guha gudi. The ancient temple is believed t be existing from Tretha Yuga. According to legends, the Narsimha Swami or Narsimhadri temple, situated on a hill called Stambhadri, is said to have existed since 1.6 million years. The town is located on the banks of the River Munneru, which is tributary to River Krishna. During Tretha Yugam Mouthgalya Maharishi with his disciples penance here in a cave and he was blessed by Lord Vishnu. Mothgalya Maharishi requested Lord Vishnu to stay back in this place along with Lakshmi. Lord came out of the pillar as Sri Lakshmi Narashima Swamy. Hence the place was known as Sthambadri. The temple is on a vertical rock which is known as Khamba which means Pillar. The temple is on khamba so it was originally known as Sthamba Sikari which later turned into Sthambadri. At present the place is known as Khammam, which was derived fr

Lakaram Lake

Lakaram Lake is a lake nestled in the calm and serene ambience of Khammam District in Telangana. It is one of the major tourist attractions in Telangana and can be a wonderful place for a family picnic. Surrounded by lush green trees and plants, the Lakaram Lake offers scenic views of the beauties of nature and several reasons to admire it. The location of the lake is very convenient as it is just 4 kilometres away from the bus stand. 15 years ago, it was just a lake with waste trees and herbs, but now it has been developed as an amazing tourist spot. The lake also features with a lush green park where you can enjoy and relax in the lap of the nature. You can also enjoy boating in the calm and tranquil water of the lake and witness the beautiful lush green surroundings. Lakaram lake is the biggest lake among all which had been chosen under the prestigious project Mission Kakatiya for restoring of the lakes in Telangana. Source http://www.touristlink.com/india/lakaram-lake/overvi

Kusumanchi Temples

Kusumanchi is a town and Mandal in Khammam district, Telangana, India, which was popularly known as Krupamani during the Kakatiya period. The Shivalingam in this shrine is one of the largest in Telangana. There is a 15 ft high idol of Lord Venu Gopala Swamy on the southern side of the temple. Jakkepalli, Kistapuram, Kokya Thanda, Lokya Thanda, Mallaigudem, Munigepalli, Naikangudem, Narasimhulagudem and Palair are some of the tribal villages located in the vicinity of Kusumanchi which can be visited. Kakatiya rulers built Ganapeshwaralayam, Mukkanteswaralayam in Kusumanchi After being neglected for decades, the historical Siva temples of Kakatiya era in Kusumanchi mandal headquarters are set to undergo renovation. Sri Ganapeshwaralayam and Mukkanteswaralayam, the two Siva temples built by Kakatiya rulers during 12th and 3th centuries in Kusumanchi stand testimony to the architectural acumen of the great Kakatiya kings. The historical shrines resemble the famous Ghanpur and R

Khammam Fort

Khammam Fort is located in the city of Khammam, Telangana, India.  The fort is believed to have been built by the Kakatiya rulers in 950 AD. It served as an impregnable citadel during various regimes of different dynasties, including the Kakatiyas, Qutb Shahi’s and Asaf Jahis.  The fort was situated in a very vast area in the heart of the City of Khammam. It was notified as a protected monument by the Archaeology Department several decades ago.Despite decades of neglect, the historical edifice, which once flourished with regal opulence, presents its alluring charm due to its architectural splendor. The funds to build this Fort complex were procured by three army men Lakshma Reddy, Ranga Reddy and Velama Reddy of the Kakatiya dynasty. It is believed that gold coins used in construction of this fort were unearthed from their farm near Khammam and Upon receiving the news from these men, the then Kakatiya king ordered them to build a Fort on the Hill in Khammam which is know

Nelakondapalli

Nelakondapalli is a town and a mandal headquarters in Khammam district, Telangana, India, located at a distance of 21 km from Khammam. Nelakondapalli is a historic site, which includes a mud fortification wall that covers 100 acres. Excavations by archaeologists have unearthed the foundations of viharas, cisterns, wells, one Mahastupa, terracotta idols, a bronze idol of Lord Buddha and a miniature stupa carved in limestone, and other historic materials from third and fourth centuries. Archaeological sites of historical importance dating back to the days of Mahabharata such as Virataraju Dibba and Keechaka Gundam are located within one and a half kilometer from Nelakondapalli. The relics, which were found at this place, strengthen the belief that it was a prominent place right from ancient times. Nelakondapalli also has ancient temples like three Shiva temples as well as two Vaishnava temples. The Dusshera festival celebrations in Nelakondapalli attract devotees from other plac

Nelakondapalli

Nelakondapalli is a town and a mandal headquarters in Khammam district, Telangana, India, located at a distance of 21 km from Khammam. Nelakondapalli is a historic site, which includes a mud fortification wall that covers 100 acres. Excavations by archaeologists have unearthed the foundations of viharas, cisterns, wells, one Mahastupa, terracotta idols, a bronze idol of Lord Buddha and a miniature stupa carved in limestone, and other historic materials from third and fourth centuries. Archaeological sites of historical importance dating back to the days of Mahabharata such as Virataraju Dibba and Keechaka Gundam are located within one and a half kilometer from Nelakondapalli. The relics, which were found at this place, strengthen the belief that it was a prominent place right from ancient times. Nelakondapalli also has ancient temples like three Shiva temples as well as two Vaishnava temples. The Dusshera festival celebrations in Nelakondapalli attract devotees from other places. Nelak

Daasarathi Krishnamacharyulu

Name         :  Dasarathi Krishnamacharyulu / Daasarathi Born       :  July 22, 1925  Chinnaguduru, Maripeda, Mahabubabad Died       :  Nov 5, 1987 Education  :  B.A degree from Osmania University, Hyderabad. Profession :  Freedom Fighter, Poet and Lyricist Titles     :  Abhyudhaya Kavi and Kalaprapurna నా తెలంగాణ, కోటి రతనాల వీణ  ( Naa Telangaana, Koti Ratanaala Veena) An orthodox, but discreet, Vaishnava bhakta, he was an erudite scholar of Indian mythology (puranas). He was interested in linguistics and mastered Sanskrit, Telugu, Tamil, Hindi, Urdu, Persian, English languages. He matriculated from the Khammam Government High School but gave up higher education to join the movement against the autocratic Nizam rule in the Hyderabad Kingdom. Freedom Fighter and Poet As a volunteer in the left-wing Andhra Mahasabha movement, Dasarathi travelled from village to village in Telangana to enlighten the public. Mahatma Gandhi and Kandukuri Veeresalingam influenced him

Natavadi Chiefs

The Natavadis or Natavatis ruled over Natavadi vishaya from c.1050 AD - 1269 AD with capital at Madapalli (Khammam).  1101 AD : Their earliest inscription found in Narsampet in Warangal District. Madapalli has been identified with the village Madapalle near Madhira, Khammama district, which gains support from the Nidikonda inscription. So there is no probability of its identity with the village Madepalle near Ellore. Natavadi chiefs, were originally subordinates of Western Chalukyas. Later on, they shifted their loyalty to the Kakatiyas. c.1050 AD : Beta Kshanipalaka figuring in the Inugurti inscriptions was probably the earliest Natavadi chief known so far and father of Durgaraja. He may be placed tentatively around 1050 AD. 1104 AD - 1157 AD : Durga   He issued records of him own. His earliest inscription is from Nidikonda in Nalgonda district dated in the 29th year of C.V. era. Corresponding to December 24, 1104 AD. Durga is mentioned as Dugga and Duggaraja in the record and as D

Malyala Chiefs

Founder : Danna Senani Forts :  Sankisapura (Dornakal, Khammam), Malyala, Kondaparthi, Vardhamanapuram (Mahabubnagar) Durjaya Danna Senani Capital : Sankisapura (Khammam) Stated to be lord of the town Malyala. General of Beta II (1076 - 1108) to Prola II (1116 - 1157) in Polavasa, Manthrakutamu and Kandur battles. He has 2 sons Danna ruling from  Sankisapura (Khammama)  and  Bachavarudhini who was ruling from  Vardhamanapura (Mahabubnagar). Sankisapura (Khammam) Branch Sabba Senani  son of Danna Senani Capital : Sankisapura Wife    : Aachamma 1195 AD : Kata Senani  Son of Sabba Senani Capital : Sankisapura General of Kakatiya Rudra Deva (1158 - 1195) took active part in capturing Dharanikota. Built Trikutesvaralyam     Potha Senani  Son of Kata Senani Capital : Sankisapuram General of Prataparudra, Mahadeva & Ganapati Deva 1202 AD : Chaunda Senani  Son of Kata Senani Lived in Kondaparthi near Orugallu as a general of army protecting the Fort. Built Chaundeshwaralaya Temple. Wife  

Viriyala Chiefs

Founder : Poranti or Poranki Venna Head Quarters : Katukuru   Descendants of Durjaya dynasty, like Kakatiyas and served as chiefs of army. The Viriyala chiefs continued as subordinate/feudatory rulers for Rashtra kutas, Kalyani Chalukyas and Kakatiyas for around 600 years. Their history is reconstructed through ‘Gudur’, Moripirala, Kalukur, Pammi and Rayaparty inscriptions issued by themselves. According to their inscriptions, the founder of their dynasty was Poranti Venna. Poranti or Poranki Venna According to the ‘Gudur1 inscription, after several kings in the, Durjaya dynasty Poranaki Venna was born. It seems that he was an army chief under the Rashtrakutas. Erra Bhupati Erra Bhupati, son of Poranti Venna, succeeded his father as the chief of army of Rashtrakutas, according to Gudur inscription. Bhima After Erra Bhupati, his son Bhima became famous as the army chief of Rashtrakutas. The Gudur inscription compared him with the Bhima of Pandavas 995 A.D : Erra Narendra Erra Narendra

Mudigonda Chalukyas

c.850 AD - 1200 AD Founder : Ranamarda Capital : Mudigonda The Mudigonda Chalukyas were based east of the Kakatiya territories. They hailed from the village of Mudigonda (located near modern Khammam), and ruled most of modern-day Khammam district and east area of Warangal between the 8th and 12th centuries. They were originally subordinates of the Chalukyas of Vengi, but later passed under the suzerainty of the Western Chalukyas of Kalyani. From c.1000 onwards, Bottu Beta and his successors ruled as subordinates of the Kakatiyas. The history of family is known to us from the Mogilicheruvula grant of Kusumayudha IV, Kukunuru plates (krivvaka grant) of Kusumaditya and Nattaramesvaram records. Their kingdom bordered the kingdoms of Vengi and Malkhed. Gonagudu I Kokkiraja, Son Ruled from Capital Mudigonda. Kokkiraja was a valorous king who ruled the kingdom with the help of his brother Ranamarda. c.850 AD - 870 AD : Ranamarda, Brother He must have served the Eastern Chalukyas first and was

Khammam History

The present name of Khammam is derived its name after a local hill, which was called as 'Stambhadri'. The town was called with different names starting with Stambhadri, Kambhadri, Kambham mettu, Khammam mettu and then finally as Khammam. 700 BC - 300 BC : Assaka/Asmaka/Ashmaka (The 16 Mahajanapadas) 300 BC - 185 BC  :  Mauryan Empire 230 BC  – 220 AD  : Satavahanas  ( Were vassals of Mauryan Empire)​ 220 AD - 250 AD  : Ikshvaku Tribe 250 AD - 500 AD  : Vakataka Dynasty 500 AD - 543 AD  : Vishnukundins 543 AD - 753 AD  : Badami Chalukyas 750 AD to 1323 AD  : Kakatiyas ruled as vassals to Rashrakuta Dynasty from 753 AD - 982 AD and Western Chalukyas (Kalyani Chalukyas) from 982 AD to 1158 with Kakatipura, Anumakonda (Hanumkonda), Orugallu (Warangal) as there capitals. Polavasa chiefs were based immediately north of the Kakatiya territories. They ruled over most of Karimnagar district and the northern part of Warangal district from their capital at Polavasa, which is the modern-d