Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from December, 2017

Jagdevpur Varadaraju Swamy Temple

Jagdevpur Varadaraju Swamy Temple is located in Vardarajpur, Jagdevpur Mandal, Siddipet District, Telangana, India. On the name of the god varadaraj swamy the village is designated. To the village premises hanuman temple is located. Every year in the month of may a famous festive ''jatara'' in the name of god varadaraj swamy will be taken place.on day of vyshaka pouranami" celebration are carried in huge way. According to sources temple was built in 1356a.d, four fathers of present chairaman family developed this historic place, they were carring varadaraja swamy idol from vishnu kanchi(kanchipurm,T.N) to their native raygadh. at that they were resting for night, in dreams lord vardaraja swamy told them built temple here only but he thought this place is not suitable hence vardaraja swamy is their homeidol, he wanted place it their own place(raygadh). next morning their journey started but axle of thier cart was broken it took whole day to repair ,once again lord

Deval Masjid

Deval Masjid located in Buswatarag Nagar, Bodhan, Nizamabad, as its name signifies  is a a Jain temple built during the 9th and 10th century by the Rashtrakuta king Indra III. It was later modified by the Kalyani Chalukya king Someswara. It was he, who named the temple as Indranarayana Swamy Temple. During the invasion by Muhammad-bin-Tughlaq in the Deccan, this temple was converted into a mosque.  This is a star-shaped building which has undergone no alteration at the hands of conquerors except removal of star chamber and setting up of a pulpit. The roof has been embellished with domes which are a salient feature of Muslim architecture. Some inscriptions by Muhammad-bin-Tughlaq can also be seen here. Confluence of cultures A new mosque is built adjacent to the old mosque, which is now used for prayers. Though it was great to see the place, the first look was rather disappointing as it was heavily littered and not well kept. Now that the new mosque has been buil

Mayuri Nursery

Mayuri Nursery, located about 5 kilometers from National Highway 44 at Shankarayapalle, Jadcherla and about 8 kilometers from the Mahbubnagar district headquarters, is fast gearing up to become one of the most sought after tourists spots in the district with world-class amenities like an amphitheatre, swimming pools and a yoga centre. Mayuri Central Nursery, located between Mahbubnagar and Jadcherla highway, is an ideal location for developing the eco-tourism project in the district. As the region lies on the slopes of Bontagattu mountain range, the hilly slopes, valleys and flat mountain tops dotted with trees and a large spread of green forest cover all around provide the perfect venue for the tourists to enjoy the beauty of the region. The entire eco-tourism region includes the entire mountain range and the deep forests spreading over 2,500 hectares from Appanapally to Mammadabad. At present as part of first phase of the project only about 200 hectares are earmarked for the de

Narayanpet Saree

The Narayanpet saree is made either of cotton or silk.  One school of thought states that in 1630 AD during Shivaji Maharaj’s campaign in the Deccan, the brightly coloured saris of the ladies caught his eye and thus the Narayanpet saree got its Royal Maratha Patronage. Other versions of the tale state that the weavers, who were part of Shivaji’s camp during a campaign, were the ones who stayed back and developed the form as we see it today. Much before the world was made aware of the concept of a global village, the Indian Subcontinent had embraced the idea. The merger of cultures of different princely states and regions in the country has produced some fantastic weaves and styles that are heralded to this day for their sheer beauty and exclusivity. The Narayanpet saree is one such example. These sarees have had the privilege of enjoying the royal patronage of the Marathas. Regarded as the garment of the Gods, Narayanpet sarees were used to drape the idols of deities and wor

Nirmal Toys

Nirmal Toys world-famous wooden toys are made in the historic town of Nirmal in Telangana state derived its name from that of a 17th-century ruler, Nimma Naidu, who had a great interest in art and toy-making. Back then, he collected about 80 artists and started a toy-making industry that came to add cultural significance to the town. The Nirmal toy cluster has 60 families registered with the state rural self-help group, who keep the craft alive, making toys that are sold through state emporia. The cluster earns revenues in the range of Rs 3- 4 lakh per month. Considering that the cluster largely produces toys, which is a non-essential item, there is always the danger of artisans losing interest in this traditional craft and moving on to more lucrative occupations. However, the award of the Geographic Indication (GI) status to Nirmal toys in 2009 was a morale booster for them. The GI status acts as a flagging device that helps producers differentiate the Nirmal toys from competing pr

Nirmal Furniture

Nirmal Furniture is furniture made in Nirmal, Adilabad, Telangana, India. It received Geographical Indication rights in 2009.  It is handmade wooden furniture. Nirmal Painted Furniture, a Brand in Itself! Every region in India, is known for its unique culture and traditions, which have also influenced the local art. Nirmal town in northern part of Telangana state shares its unique, legendary identity in the arena of arts and crafts. The skill of the artisans and craftsmen of Nirmal town is well known, right from the pre-independence days. The origin of Nirmal art and craft is traced back to the Kakatiya era. Nirmal works were influenced by the Indian Schools of Art like Kangra, Ajanta and also the Mughal miniatures. It is even said that once the Nizam of Hyderabad was accorded a grand welcome when he visited Nirmal. The artisans decorated the venue and the seat of the Nizam in a very grand manner with an intricately designed banana bud which was believed to have been suspende

Karimnagar Silver Filigree

Karimnagar Silver Filigree is a silver filigree made in Karimnagar, India. It is an ancient art of Karimnagar. Karimnagar Silver Filigree received Intellectual property rights protection or Geographical Indication (GI) status in 2007. Silver filigree, the ancient art of making silver artefacts and ornaments by using silver wire, an art which Karimnagar town is famous for, cries for attention, protection and promotion of the age-old art and tradition. Silver filigree was popular during the Nizam era when the rulers encouraged the silversmiths to make the exquisite silver plates, ‘pandhan’ and other artefacts as show-pieces. These artefacts made by the silversmiths of Karimnagar were made available at Salar Jung Museum in Hyderabad. Since 19th Century AD, the very talented craftsmen of Karimnagar fashioned rich intricate trellis/Jali made of twisted silver wire. The locals say that this unique craft was adopted some 200 years ago by the Elgandal town near the Karimnagar

Gadwal Saree

Gadwal Saree is a handcrafted woven sari style in Gadwal of Jogulamba Gadwal district in the Indian state of Telangana. Gadwal sarees are made from cotton and silk which is usually tussar or mulberry. “The dyeing is usually done at Chirala where the yarn is dipped in boiled coloured water at an extremely high temperature. Higher temperature means the colour will last a long time. It was registered as one of the geographical indication from Telangana by Geographical Indications of Goods (Registration and Protection) Act, 1999. Though Gadwal is the most famous of all, there is an entire of cluster of smaller villages also engaged in weaving these sarees. Over 800 looms are used every day at Rajoli village to create these seven yard beauties. All sarees produced here are sold to the master weavers of Gadwal, which is probably why Rajoli is overshadowed. Other notable villages where they are made are Gattu, Yemmiganur, Aiza and Nagaladinne. It takes painstaking effort over

Pochampally Saree

Pochampally saree or Pochampalli Ikat originates from the Bhoodan Pochampally region in Yadadri Bhuvanagiri district, Telangana. These popular sarees are renowned by their typical geometric patterns and the special Ikat style of dyeing. The uniqueness of Pochampally Ikat is its ability to create extremely complicated designs using bright dyes. The fabrics used are natural – cotton, silk and sico (a combination of silk and cotton). The painstaking weave and meticulous eye for detail makes the Pochampally weavers stand apart and are revered throughout the textile industry. Chintakindi Mallesham, a Class 6 school dropout from Telangana, has innovated the Laxmi Asu Machine easing the taxing manual process of weaving Pochampally saris and helping weavers increase their production without putting their health at risk. Pochampally Ikat uniqueness lies in the transfer of intricate design and colouring onto warp and weft threads first and then weave them together globally known