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Showing posts from September, 2017

Cheriyal Scroll Painting

Cheriyal Scroll Painting is a stylized version of Nakashi art, rich in the local motifs peculiar to the Telangana. Several hundred years ago, Kaki Podagollu, a story telling community would travel through Telengana, singing and narrating stories, and depicting them in a visual format. An hour’s drive from Hyderabad is the village of Cheriyal in Siddipet district, Telangana. Here is where the famous ‘Cheriyal Scrolls’ come from.   These canvas scrolls made from Khadi are hand-painted in a style unique to the local motifs and iconography. Characterised by a dominance of the colour red in the background, these brilliantly hued paintings even received Geographical Indication Status in 2007. Painted in panels as a narrative, these are like comic strips from the past, depicting scenes and stories from Indian mythology and epics. Distinct in their style they immediately convey age-old Indian traditions and customs in a beautiful and engaging manner. Of which, both the Lords Krish

Koyyur Jain Caves Nayanagulllu

The monolithic caves of Jain pantheon near Koyyur Village, Malharrao Mandal in the Jayashankar Bhupalpally district are set to hog the limelight with theForest Department making efforts to incorporate the structure into its ongoing eco-tourism programme. Situated on a hillock among scenic surroundings on the banks of river Manair, the caves stand out as an example of Indian rock-cut architecture. Hewn in solid sandstone precipice the caves testify the prevalence of Jainism in these parts during ancient times. Though the caves were found long ago, they remained uncared for. With an intention to draw public attention to these caves, Bhupalpally Forest Department officials are planning to lay pathways to ensure better connectivity to the caves called locally as ‘Nayanagulllu’. At a distance of two km there is a Nagulamma Temple which is frequented by devotees on weekends and on auspicious occasions. It is proposed to lay a pathway from the temple and from Mainar bridge near Adav

Devuni Gutta Temple

Devuni Gutta temple is located 2.5 km away from Kothur village, near Jangalapalli of Mulugu mandal in Mulugu district. It is only when one chats up with the villagers of Kothur that the temple is mentioned. The journey to reach this temple is as interesting as the temple itself. The temple is on a densely forested hill locally called ‘Devuni Gutta’. One has to walk from the village through a forest. About halfway up, the path becomes a water path — a stream or a rivulet that one can walk through. The watery path runs for a kilometre at least. Even as you enjoy the walk, you also get to see beautiful waterfalls at several places. Upon reaching the top of the hill, one comes upon this absolutely stunning temple with carvings on all four walls sitting snug within a lush green environ. It looks like it is made of bricks but up close one can see that the blocks are a mixture of sand and stone. Lime mortar was used for plastering. The carvings were made on these square and rectangle