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Ramappa Temple Inscriptions

 Inscriptions carved on a square pillar of highly polished black basalt, standing in front of a square chhatri to the north-east of the temple  Translation of inscription in the Great Temple, recording grant of Recherla Rudra in A. D. 1213. (By Dr. L. D. Barnett, Litt. D.) Obeisance to the blessed Rudresvara! May that Ganadhisa protect you on whose cheek, besprinkled with rutting ichor, the line of bees appears distinctly like a streak of musk. May the goddess Sarada, giver of boons, whose lotus-feet are adored by the troops of gods and demons, ever grant you joy. May that god Siva, whose diadem is the moon, at whose pair of lotus-feet the mass of quivering rays from the sapphires in the crest of obeisant lords of the gods assumes the semblance of gadding bees, be for your prosperity. May that lord Sripati, in sport (assuming the form of) a Boar, be for your happiness—he Avhose body, covered with all the waters of the ocean like drops of sweat and holding the earth fixed on the tip of

Neelakanteshwara Temple

Sri Neelakanteshwara Temple is located on a beautiful Highway to Nagpur in the centre of Nizamabad Town is famous for its architecture. Apart from architecture, there is another unique factor to this temple. It is the presence of the Big Three here: Lord Shiva in Linga form, who is Swayambhu; Lord Vishnu lying supine like Lord Padmanabhaswamy and Lord Brahma sitting on his lotus. Devotees throng this temple because of the presence of the Holy Triumvirate . Kanteshwar is popular for an ancient temple dedicated to Lord Shiva. The temple is said to be about 500 years old and stands as an example of the architecture of the time during which it was built. This ancient temple was built by Satakarni II for Jains, who was a popular Satavahana King. During Kakatiya period, the Jain mandiram was converted to a Shiva temple when many Jains also converted to Hinduism. The structure resembles the Nagara style or Hindu architecture with influences from north. While some legends say that th

Mesolithic paintings of Mancherial

Mesolithic cave paintings found in Thaatimattayya hills of Buggagattu forest in Mancherial district of Telangana State. Historian Dr Dyavanapalli Satyanarayana has claimed that he explored the site in the Buggagattu forest area with the help of the local Naikpod tribes. He said cave paintings at Thaatimattayya are dated to be 13,000 years B.P. According to Satyanarayana, he came across the ten types of paintings drawn in five colours. Dr Satyanarayana said ‘even today families of Naikpod worship the ‘Thaatimatayyah’ or Thaadu which means palm tree. One of the most striking features of the cave paintings is the drawings of perfect circles.  It seems that the prehistoric artist had used geometric measurements to draw the circles. The circles represented human heads, womb/vagina, flying saucers, dumbbells/tool kits, sun and moon discs. The Mesolithic Age people inserted the small chips of chert stone (one-inch long and centimeter width) in the full cleavage of fist fi

Jurassic Period

Dinosaurs are known to have lived between 230 and 65 million years ago, a periodthat is known as the Mesozoic Era. The period is many million years before the first modern humans, Homo sapiens, appeared.  Scientists divide the Mesozoic Era into three periods: the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous. The 16-foot-high ‘Kotasaurus Yamanpalliensis', was found during an excavation by the Geological Survey of India (GSI) in Yamanapalli region of Adilabad district. A GSI team unearthed the skeletons of gigantic reptiles, which lived on earth approximately 165 million years ago in the Lower Jurassic period.The GSI and Birla Science Centre worked together and mounted  at Birla Museum  in 2000.  The GSI, which excavated the region for more than two-and-a-half decades, had collected nearly 840 skeletal remains belonging to various Sauropod dinosaurs.  All the 840 skeletal parts belonged to 12 individual dinosaurs from a single species, ‘Sauropod dinosaurs’, which ruled the earth for

History of Telangana Timeline

  https://www.livemint.com/Politics/PoLP4pVAlPvCcmvutRcByO/Telangana-becomes-Indias-29th-state-KC-Rao-sworn-in-as-chi.html

Nandikonda

Nandikonda is a small village located along the banks of Krishna River in Peddavura Mandal     Nalgonda district. It is located close to the magnificent Nagarjuna Sagar dam. Nandikonda was part of the Ikshvaku Dynasty and the village shot into prominence after scores of ancient Buddhist structures like pillared halls and monasteries were unearthed. The relics that were unearthed during a series of excavations are today displayed at the Museum of Central Archeological Department here. There are also ruins of a fort dating back to Ikshvaku Dynasty. The citadel consists of gates, strong fortifications, water trenches, and even as rectangular-shaped stadium were found during archeological excavations. The Nagarjuna Sagar dam was initially called Nandikonda project and the place finds place in the Buddhist circuit of Telangana. http://www.telanganatourism.gov.in/partials/destinations/heritage-spots/nalgonda/nandikonda.html

Taramati Baradari

Taramati Baradari is a historical sarai as part of Ibrahim Bagh, a Persian style garden built during the reign of Ibrahim Quli Qutub Shah, the second Sultan of Golconda The Baradari was constructed on the banks of the Musi river. Today, the region comes under the city limits of Hyderabad, India. The tourism department attributes the name to the reign of the Seventh Sultan of Golconda, Abdullah Qutb Shah who as an ode to his favorite courtesan, Taramati, is said to have named the sarai Taramati Baradari. The tourism department promotes the location by romantic stories linking the then-Sultan with a courtesan named Taramati. One such story goes that during the reign of Abdullah Qutb Shah, he used to hear Taramati’s voice as she sang for travelers at the serai, while he sat two kilometers away at Golconda fort. Her melodious voice was carried by the breeze, reaching the prince’s ear at the fort. There is no recorded report of the same. Another fable tells of two ravishing dancing

Sardar Papanna

Sardar Sarvayi Papanna Goud born in Goud Community at Quileshapur Village, Raghunathpally Mandal, Jangaon District. He fought against the Muslim rule in Telangana. His name, also spelt as Sardar Sarvai Papanna or Sardar Sarvay Papanna or Papadu also built a fort in Quileshapur which was also considered as capital city. Papadu (also known as Papanna and Pap Rai) (died 1710) was a highwayman and bandit of early-18th century India who rose from humble beginnings to become a folklore hero. His deeds have been described by historians Barbara and Thomas Metcalf as "Robin Hood-like", while another historian, Richard Eaton, considers him to be a good example of a social bandit. Papadu lived during the period when the Mughal Empire had expanded its interests in South India and when tensions between the Muslim ruler Aurangzeb and his Hindu populace were rising.  Towards the end of his life, after the death of Aurangzeb and amid the subsequent power struggle for suc

Quileshapur Fort

Authorities of the State Archaeology department are planning to develop the Quilla (fort) at Quilla Shapur or Quileshapur village of Raghunathpally mandal in Jangoan district, thanks to the State government’s commitment to conserve monuments. A detailed project report (DPR) on the development of the fort built in 18th century by Sarvai Papadu, popularly known as Sardar Sarvai Papanna, has been prepared by the department of archaeology and museums and the worth of the proposed works is Rs 50 lakhs. Incidentally, Telangana State Tourism Development Corporation (TSTDC) chairman and former DGP Pervaram Ramulu and former minister Ponnala Lakshmaiah were born in the village that is located about six kms away from Hyderabad-Warangal highway. Though the fort was built with stones, the walls and the ramparts have already developed cracks as no attempt to conserve this fort was made so far. Considering the historical value of this fort, the State archaeology department included it in

Munigadapa Siddipet

Archaeology officials have identified an ancient idol Shaivite Veeragallu at a farmer’s field at Munigadapa village of Jagadevpur. It belongs to 12-13th century AD. Assistant Director of Archaeology and Museums, Telangana, P Nagaraju clarified that some locals mistook it as idol of lord Shiva, but actually it is a Veeragallu idol. “Number of such idols have been found across Telangana in the past too,” said Nagaraju. He further said that they were planning to make a visit to Munigadapa after informing the Director of Archaeology and Museums, NR Visalatchy to find out if there were any historical sites that were located at Munigadapa. The idol was found at the farm of farmer Vadde Narsimhulu on last Thursday. Locals, Krishna Murthy and Venkata Swamy identified it recently. Source https://telanganatoday.news/shaivite-veeragallu-idol-found

Ippagudem, Jangoan

Much to the delight of archaeologists and historians, a rare idol of Tara – the female Bodhisattva in Mahayana Buddhism who appears as a female Buddha in Vajrayana Buddhism – was found at Ippagudem in Station Ghanpur mandal recently. Archaeology and history enthusiast R Rathnakar Reddy found the black granite idol abandoned near the bund of a tank. He first mistook it for Yakshini of Jain mythology. But later, noted archaeologist and historian Emani Shivanagi Reddy confirmed it as Tara. “It was Shivanagi Reddy who identified the idol as Tara. There is an engraved image of Buddha on the hair bun. The deity’s upper body is naked with large breasts, which is the most common description of Tara in Buddhist literature,” Rathnakar said. Rathnakar also found a broken idol of Buddha near the black granite structure, which helped them confirm that it was Tara. Both the idols – three-ft-tall Tara and four-ft-tall Buddha – take historians and archeologists closer to the Buddhist era. It is beli

Padurivarigudem, Nalgonda

Archaeologists have discovered an ancient menhir, a memorial from the Iron Age, in Padurivarigudem in Nalgonda district of Telangana. The structure stands 11 feet high and was built as a memorial for warriors or tribal leaders in the region. Similar relics have been found in Guntur too. E. Siva Nagi Reddy and his associates uncovered the massive menhir that, according to them, dates back to 1000 BC. “Based on the information that we received from T. Saidulu, president of the local Vivekananda Youth Association, we visited the spot on Thursday and confirmed that the menhir belongs to the Megalithic period. It stands 11 feet tall, is six feet in width and goes six feet deep into the soil. The massive stone slab was installed during the Iron Age as a memorial to tribal lords or warriors in the region. It reveals the collective efforts of the ancient iron-smelting community,” he said. The team of archaeologists also examined around 20 circular burial stones, also from the Megalithic age,